Graduate Profiles

Wilson, Ciann


Email:

  • wilsonci@yorku.ca

  • Year Entered: 2011

    Student Info

    Dissertation Title

    Beyond the Colonial Divide: Alliance Building Between African Diasporic and Indigenous Communities

    Comprehensive Areas

    • African, Caribbean and Aboriginal communities
    • Anti-colonial theory
    • Community based interventions
    • Critical race and class theories
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Political economy of health
    • Public health
    • Quantitative, qualitative and indigenous research methodologies
    • The social determinants

    Committees

    an-Paul Restoule (OISE, U of T), Honor Ford-Smith, Sarah Flicker (supervisor)

    Previous Education

  • Environmental/Sustainability Education Diploma, York University, 2011
  • Honors Bachelor of Science with Distinction, University of Toronto (St. GeorgeCampus), 2009
  • MES Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University, Toronto, 2011
  • Publications

    Publications

    Articles in Press

    • C. Wilson. (2011). Let’s Talk About Sex: Exploring Young Women’s Agency in this Context of Risk. York Institute of Health Research 2011 Graduate Symposium Proceedings. 

    • C. Wilson. (2011). The Impact of the Criminalization of HIV Non-Disclosure on the Health and Human Rights of Black Communities. Health Tomorrow: Interdisciplinarity and Internationality Journal. 

    • C. Wilson. (2011). Let’s Talk About Sex: Photo Gallery. Girlhood Studies Journal. 4; 2 pp.148 - 162 

    • Marshall, Z., Nixon, S., Nepveux, D., Vo, T., Wilson, C., Flicker, S., McClelland, A. & Proudfood, D. (2011) (invited submission). Ethical challenges in a community-based sexual health study with lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer young people labeled with intellectual disabilities. Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics. From the Contractual to the Relational: Critical Issues in HIV-Related Community-Based Participatory Research (Special Issue).

    • A.McClelland, T. Vo, S. Nixon, R. Travers, D. Proudfoot, Z. Marshall, D. Nepveux, C. Wilson, S. Flicker “Seeking safer sexual spaces: Queer and trans young people labeled with intellectual disabilities and the paradoxical risks of restriction.” Journal of Homosexuality. Journal of Homosexuality special issue on LGBT health

    Articles in the works

    • C. Wilson. Let’s Talk About Sex and Money – An exploration of economically motivated relationships amongst young Black Women in Canada in Legacy of the Crossing: Life, death and triumph among descendants of the world’s greatest forced migration. Johns Hopkins University Press. Baltimore, Maryland. 

    • S. Flicker, C. Wilson, Z. Marshall, S. Nixon, T. Vo, R. Travers, A. McClelland, & D. Proudfoot. “Condoms and Contradictions: How Queer Youth Labeled with Intellectual Disabilities Navigate Safer Sex Decisions.” 

    • C. Wilson. Jezebel: Exploring the impact of stereotypes on the sexualities and sexual health of young Black women. 

    • C. Wilson and N. Lee-Foon. The Sex and YOUth Project: Transforming Knowledge and Exchange

    • C. Wilson and S. Flicker. Arts-Based Methods. Encyclopedia on Action Research. SAGE.  

    Services & Experience

    Services & Experience

    Conference & Presentations

    Conference & Presentations

    Conference Presentations

    • C. Wilson. Jezebel: Exploring the impact of stereotypes on thesexualities and sexual health of young Black women. Race and Sexuality Conference – Simone de Beuvoir Institute. April17-19th 2013. Montreal.

    • C. Wilson and N. Lee-Foon. The Sex and YOUth Project: TransformingKnowledge and Exchange. The 22 nd Annual Canadian Conference onHIV/AIDS Research (CAHR 2013).  April 11 -14th, 2013. Vancouver.

    • C. Wilson and N. Lee-Foon. The Sex and YOUth Project:Transforming Knowledge and Exchange. Student Symposium on Urban Youth and The Determinants of Sexual Health .  March 28th ,2013. Toronto.

    • C. Wilson. Jezebel: Exploring the impact of stereotypes on thesexualities and sexual health of young Black women. Institute of Gender and Health Conference.  October, 2012.Montreal.

    • C. Wilson. Let’s Talk About Sex and Money: An exploration ofeconomically motivated relationships amongst young Black women in Toronto. International Conference on Health in the African Diaspora. July 4 – 8th, 2012. Baltimore, Maryland.

    • C. Wilson. Jezebel: Exploring the impact of stereotypes on thesexualities and sexual health of young Black women. Student Symposium on Urban Youth and The Determinants of Sexual Health .  March 22nd ,2012. Toront

    • C. Wilson. Let’s Talk About Sex: Exploring Social Influences onthe Sexual Health of Young Racialized Women. The Annual OHTN Conference. November, 2011. Toronto

    • C. Wilson. Let`s Talk About Sex. The Art of PublicHealth Conference. September, 2011. Toronto.

    • C. Wilson. The Let’s Talk About Sex Project. Women’sWorlds Conference. July, 2011. Ottawa.

    • C. Wilson. The Let’s Talk About Sex Project. YorkInstitute of Health Research Graduate Symposium. April, 2011. Toronto.

    • C. Wilson (Presenting Author), S. Flicker, S. Nixon, Z.Marshall, T. Vo, R. Travers, A. McClelland, D. Proudfoot. “Condoms and Contradictions: How Queer Youth Labeled with Intellectual Disabilities Navigate Safer Sex Decisions.”  The 20thAnnual Canadian Conference on HIV/AIDS Research (CAHR 2011). Toronto.

    • C. Wilson (Presenting Author), S. Flicker, S. Nixon, Z.Marshall, T. Vo, R. Travers, A. McClelland, D. Proudfoot. “Condoms and Contradictions: How Queer Youth Labeled with Intellectual Disabilities Navigate Safer Sex Decisions.”  The 2011 YouthSexual Health Student Research Symposium. Toronto.

    • C. Wilson (Presenting Author), S. Flicker, S. Nixon, Z.Marshall, T. Vo, R. Travers, A. McClelland, D. Proudfoot. “How Queer Youth Labeled with Intellectual Disabilities Navigate Safer Sex Decisions.”  The Annual OHTN Conference. November, 2010. Toronto

    • C. Wilson. Dordabis Youth Photovoice Project. StudentSymposium on Urban Youth and The Determinants of Sexual Health.March, 2010. Toronto.

    • C. Wilson. The Let’s Talk About Sex Project. Ethnicity Conference; University of Toronto . January, 2010. Toronto.

    Why FES?

    FES fosters a vibrant culture of interdisciplinary studies that attracts organic minds from all walks of life and fields of work. This environment allows for critical discussion and scholarship around some of the most difficult and contentious social issues of our time. I wouldn't want to be anywhere else.