Art Installation



Art Installations by Nancy Deleary

Nancy Deleary is an Independent Artist and a member of the Chippewas of the Thames First Nation. She earned her Bachelor of Fine at The Institute of American Indian Art and finished her Masters of Fine Art at the Vermont College of Fine Arts. Her goal is to build a place of learning and creativity through an artist’s studio and gallery on the First Nation. Below are two of the pieces that will be at the symposium on May 26th.

Deshkan_Ziibing_2C_Our_River

Deshkan Ziibing, or Antlered River by the Anishinaabeg is commonly known today as the Thames River, named in 1793 after England’s river Thames.

The inspiration behind this piece was to create a visual representation of the reality my people live within the confines of colonization.  It speaks of a misinterpretation of the treaties that our ancestors agreed to hundreds of years ago.

Elements of the installation bring to mind the memories of how the river sustained the people not very long ago, and of a worldview that was once prolifically shared amongst the people during the time spent along the river.

Honouring_My_Grandmothers_and_Grandfathers_

My grandmothers, Eva Shilling and Gladys Deleary both attended the Mount Elgin Indian Industrial School.  They spent most of their childhoods within the institution.

Eva was from the Chippewas of Rama First Nation, she stayed within the system until she was 18 years old.  She was a talented seamstress, utilizing her skills in sewing the clothes for the children.  Gladys was a member of the Chippewas of the Thames First Nation, she spent many years in residential school after her father died.

I remember my grandmothers; they were both beautiful women.  They were kind and patient, and also tired and fragile.  They did not have energy to spend on me, one of their eldest of granddaughters.  Later in my life, I researched and learned of my grandmothers’ time, an era that no one talked about.  I learned about how their childhoods were stolen, as their parents gave them up due to the hardships of an impoverished and harsh life on the reserved lands for Indians.

I have little memory of my grandfathers; neither attended residential school, yet both were alcoholics and died homeless.

My grandmothers not only survived their trauma of the residential school era, but they relived the trauma through witnessing their many children suffer through their own residential school experiences.

These memories that I have are living memories.  I have no idea what my great grandparents, and the parents before them endured, for their experiences are forgotten.

Approximate number of generations of my family affected within and after the Mount Elgin Indian Industrial Institute Muncey, Ontario. 1851 - 1949

1840   Forgotten
1855   Forgotten
1870   Forgotten
1884 Great grandmother Susan Shilling-Knot
1901 Grandmother Eva Shilling
1936 Mother Jean Deleary
1961 Me Nancy Deleary
1983 Daughter Carla Jones
2011 Grand daughter Isabella Edmonds

 

In Honouring My Grandmothers and Grandfathers I also acknowledge and honour our indigenous intellectuals and knowledge holders for their diligence in sharing our original instructions and worldview. It was from them that I learned of the sacred relatives we have in all of creation. The first father of creation is the air. The first mother of creation is the earth.  It is the responsibility of Father Sky to provide for and protect Mother Earth while she gives birth and provides nourishment.  Without one or the other, we cannot survive.

The installation consists of a residential school dress that represents Mother Earth, my grandmothers, and all of our mothers; for all that she has gone through in the many generations and eras of cultural genocide and exploitation.  The YouTube video of Ryan Arcand, a homeless man from Edmonton, Alberta represents Father Sky, my grandfathers, and all of our fathers with the beautiful music he still manages to create, despite destitution and destruction, with the sounds that travel through the air, from his hands and spirit to our ears and spirit.

This art installation speaks of survivance and resilience: of the strength of spirit within to remember, overcome and express who we are.

Art Installations by Nancy Deleary

Nancy Deleary is an Independent Artist and a member of the Chippewas of the Thames First Nation. She earned her Bachelor of Fine at The Institute of American Indian Art and finished her Masters of Fine Art at the Vermont College of Fine Arts. Her goal is to build a place of learning and creativity through an artist’s studio and gallery on the First Nation. Below are two of the pieces that will be at the symposium on May 26th.

Deshkan_Ziibing_2C_Our_River

Deshkan Ziibing, or Antlered River by the Anishinaabeg is commonly known today as the Thames River, named in 1793 after England’s river Thames.

The inspiration behind this piece was to create a visual representation of the reality my people live within the confines of colonization.  It speaks of a misinterpretation of the treaties that our ancestors agreed to hundreds of years ago.

Elements of the installation bring to mind the memories of how the river sustained the people not very long ago, and of a worldview that was once prolifically shared amongst the people during the time spent along the river.

Honouring_My_Grandmothers_and_Grandfathers_

My grandmothers, Eva Shilling and Gladys Deleary both attended the Mount Elgin Indian Industrial School.  They spent most of their childhoods within the institution.

Eva was from the Chippewas of Rama First Nation, she stayed within the system until she was 18 years old.  She was a talented seamstress, utilizing her skills in sewing the clothes for the children.  Gladys was a member of the Chippewas of the Thames First Nation, she spent many years in residential school after her father died.

I remember my grandmothers; they were both beautiful women.  They were kind and patient, and also tired and fragile.  They did not have energy to spend on me, one of their eldest of granddaughters.  Later in my life, I researched and learned of my grandmothers’ time, an era that no one talked about.  I learned about how their childhoods were stolen, as their parents gave them up due to the hardships of an impoverished and harsh life on the reserved lands for Indians.

I have little memory of my grandfathers; neither attended residential school, yet both were alcoholics and died homeless.

My grandmothers not only survived their trauma of the residential school era, but they relived the trauma through witnessing their many children suffer through their own residential school experiences.

These memories that I have are living memories.  I have no idea what my great grandparents, and the parents before them endured, for their experiences are forgotten.

Approximate number of generations of my family affected within and after the Mount Elgin Indian Industrial Institute Muncey, Ontario. 1851 - 1949

1840   Forgotten
1855   Forgotten
1870   Forgotten
1884 Great grandmother Susan Shilling-Knot
1901 Grandmother Eva Shilling
1936 Mother Jean Deleary
1961 Me Nancy Deleary
1983 Daughter Carla Jones
2011 Grand daughter Isabella Edmonds

 

In Honouring My Grandmothers and Grandfathers I also acknowledge and honour our indigenous intellectuals and knowledge holders for their diligence in sharing our original instructions and worldview. It was from them that I learned of the sacred relatives we have in all of creation. The first father of creation is the air. The first mother of creation is the earth.  It is the responsibility of Father Sky to provide for and protect Mother Earth while she gives birth and provides nourishment.  Without one or the other, we cannot survive.

The installation consists of a residential school dress that represents Mother Earth, my grandmothers, and all of our mothers; for all that she has gone through in the many generations and eras of cultural genocide and exploitation.  The YouTube video of Ryan Arcand, a homeless man from Edmonton, Alberta represents Father Sky, my grandfathers, and all of our fathers with the beautiful music he still manages to create, despite destitution and destruction, with the sounds that travel through the air, from his hands and spirit to our ears and spirit.

This art installation speaks of survivance and resilience: of the strength of spirit within to remember, overcome and express who we are.



Art Installations by Nancy Deleary

Nancy Deleary is an Independent Artist and a member of the Chippewas of the Thames First Nation. She earned her Bachelor of Fine at The Institute of American Indian Art and finished her Masters of Fine Art at the Vermont College of Fine Arts. Her goal is to build a place of learning and creativity through an artist’s studio and gallery on the First Nation. Below are two of the pieces that will be at the symposium on May 26th.

Deshkan_Ziibing_2C_Our_River

Deshkan Ziibing, or Antlered River by the Anishinaabeg is commonly known today as the Thames River, named in 1793 after England’s river Thames.

The inspiration behind this piece was to create a visual representation of the reality my people live within the confines of colonization.  It speaks of a misinterpretation of the treaties that our ancestors agreed to hundreds of years ago.

Elements of the installation bring to mind the memories of how the river sustained the people not very long ago, and of a worldview that was once prolifically shared amongst the people during the time spent along the river.

Honouring_My_Grandmothers_and_Grandfathers_

My grandmothers, Eva Shilling and Gladys Deleary both attended the Mount Elgin Indian Industrial School.  They spent most of their childhoods within the institution.

Eva was from the Chippewas of Rama First Nation, she stayed within the system until she was 18 years old.  She was a talented seamstress, utilizing her skills in sewing the clothes for the children.  Gladys was a member of the Chippewas of the Thames First Nation, she spent many years in residential school after her father died.

I remember my grandmothers; they were both beautiful women.  They were kind and patient, and also tired and fragile.  They did not have energy to spend on me, one of their eldest of granddaughters.  Later in my life, I researched and learned of my grandmothers’ time, an era that no one talked about.  I learned about how their childhoods were stolen, as their parents gave them up due to the hardships of an impoverished and harsh life on the reserved lands for Indians.

I have little memory of my grandfathers; neither attended residential school, yet both were alcoholics and died homeless.

My grandmothers not only survived their trauma of the residential school era, but they relived the trauma through witnessing their many children suffer through their own residential school experiences.

These memories that I have are living memories.  I have no idea what my great grandparents, and the parents before them endured, for their experiences are forgotten.

Approximate number of generations of my family affected within and after the Mount Elgin Indian Industrial Institute Muncey, Ontario. 1851 - 1949

1840   Forgotten
1855   Forgotten
1870   Forgotten
1884 Great grandmother Susan Shilling-Knot
1901 Grandmother Eva Shilling
1936 Mother Jean Deleary
1961 Me Nancy Deleary
1983 Daughter Carla Jones
2011 Grand daughter Isabella Edmonds

 

In Honouring My Grandmothers and Grandfathers I also acknowledge and honour our indigenous intellectuals and knowledge holders for their diligence in sharing our original instructions and worldview. It was from them that I learned of the sacred relatives we have in all of creation. The first father of creation is the air. The first mother of creation is the earth.  It is the responsibility of Father Sky to provide for and protect Mother Earth while she gives birth and provides nourishment.  Without one or the other, we cannot survive.

The installation consists of a residential school dress that represents Mother Earth, my grandmothers, and all of our mothers; for all that she has gone through in the many generations and eras of cultural genocide and exploitation.  The YouTube video of Ryan Arcand, a homeless man from Edmonton, Alberta represents Father Sky, my grandfathers, and all of our fathers with the beautiful music he still manages to create, despite destitution and destruction, with the sounds that travel through the air, from his hands and spirit to our ears and spirit.

This art installation speaks of survivance and resilience: of the strength of spirit within to remember, overcome and express who we are.


Art Installations by Nancy Deleary

Nancy Deleary is an Independent Artist and a member of the Chippewas of the Thames First Nation. She earned her Bachelor of Fine at The Institute of American Indian Art and finished her Masters of Fine Art at the Vermont College of Fine Arts. Her goal is to build a place of learning and creativity through an artist’s studio and gallery on the First Nation. Below are two of the pieces that will be at the symposium on May 26th.

Deshkan_Ziibing_2C_Our_River

Deshkan Ziibing, or Antlered River by the Anishinaabeg is commonly known today as the Thames River, named in 1793 after England’s river Thames.

The inspiration behind this piece was to create a visual representation of the reality my people live within the confines of colonization.  It speaks of a misinterpretation of the treaties that our ancestors agreed to hundreds of years ago.

Elements of the installation bring to mind the memories of how the river sustained the people not very long ago, and of a worldview that was once prolifically shared amongst the people during the time spent along the river.

Honouring_My_Grandmothers_and_Grandfathers_

My grandmothers, Eva Shilling and Gladys Deleary both attended the Mount Elgin Indian Industrial School.  They spent most of their childhoods within the institution.

Eva was from the Chippewas of Rama First Nation, she stayed within the system until she was 18 years old.  She was a talented seamstress, utilizing her skills in sewing the clothes for the children.  Gladys was a member of the Chippewas of the Thames First Nation, she spent many years in residential school after her father died.

I remember my grandmothers; they were both beautiful women.  They were kind and patient, and also tired and fragile.  They did not have energy to spend on me, one of their eldest of granddaughters.  Later in my life, I researched and learned of my grandmothers’ time, an era that no one talked about.  I learned about how their childhoods were stolen, as their parents gave them up due to the hardships of an impoverished and harsh life on the reserved lands for Indians.

I have little memory of my grandfathers; neither attended residential school, yet both were alcoholics and died homeless.

My grandmothers not only survived their trauma of the residential school era, but they relived the trauma through witnessing their many children suffer through their own residential school experiences.

These memories that I have are living memories.  I have no idea what my great grandparents, and the parents before them endured, for their experiences are forgotten.

Approximate number of generations of my family affected within and after the Mount Elgin Indian Industrial Institute Muncey, Ontario. 1851 - 1949

1840   Forgotten
1855   Forgotten
1870   Forgotten
1884 Great grandmother Susan Shilling-Knot
1901 Grandmother Eva Shilling
1936 Mother Jean Deleary
1961 Me Nancy Deleary
1983 Daughter Carla Jones
2011 Grand daughter Isabella Edmonds

 

In Honouring My Grandmothers and Grandfathers I also acknowledge and honour our indigenous intellectuals and knowledge holders for their diligence in sharing our original instructions and worldview. It was from them that I learned of the sacred relatives we have in all of creation. The first father of creation is the air. The first mother of creation is the earth.  It is the responsibility of Father Sky to provide for and protect Mother Earth while she gives birth and provides nourishment.  Without one or the other, we cannot survive.

The installation consists of a residential school dress that represents Mother Earth, my grandmothers, and all of our mothers; for all that she has gone through in the many generations and eras of cultural genocide and exploitation.  The YouTube video of Ryan Arcand, a homeless man from Edmonton, Alberta represents Father Sky, my grandfathers, and all of our fathers with the beautiful music he still manages to create, despite destitution and destruction, with the sounds that travel through the air, from his hands and spirit to our ears and spirit.

This art installation speaks of survivance and resilience: of the strength of spirit within to remember, overcome and express who we are.

Art Installations by Nancy Deleary

Nancy Deleary is an Independent Artist and a member of the Chippewas of the Thames First Nation. She earned her Bachelor of Fine at The Institute of American Indian Art and finished her Masters of Fine Art at the Vermont College of Fine Arts. Her goal is to build a place of learning and creativity through an artist’s studio and gallery on the First Nation. Below are two of the pieces that will be at the symposium on May 26th.

Deshkan_Ziibing_2C_Our_River

Deshkan Ziibing, or Antlered River by the Anishinaabeg is commonly known today as the Thames River, named in 1793 after England’s river Thames.

The inspiration behind this piece was to create a visual representation of the reality my people live within the confines of colonization.  It speaks of a misinterpretation of the treaties that our ancestors agreed to hundreds of years ago.

Elements of the installation bring to mind the memories of how the river sustained the people not very long ago, and of a worldview that was once prolifically shared amongst the people during the time spent along the river.

Honouring_My_Grandmothers_and_Grandfathers_

My grandmothers, Eva Shilling and Gladys Deleary both attended the Mount Elgin Indian Industrial School.  They spent most of their childhoods within the institution.

Eva was from the Chippewas of Rama First Nation, she stayed within the system until she was 18 years old.  She was a talented seamstress, utilizing her skills in sewing the clothes for the children.  Gladys was a member of the Chippewas of the Thames First Nation, she spent many years in residential school after her father died.

I remember my grandmothers; they were both beautiful women.  They were kind and patient, and also tired and fragile.  They did not have energy to spend on me, one of their eldest of granddaughters.  Later in my life, I researched and learned of my grandmothers’ time, an era that no one talked about.  I learned about how their childhoods were stolen, as their parents gave them up due to the hardships of an impoverished and harsh life on the reserved lands for Indians.

I have little memory of my grandfathers; neither attended residential school, yet both were alcoholics and died homeless.

My grandmothers not only survived their trauma of the residential school era, but they relived the trauma through witnessing their many children suffer through their own residential school experiences.

These memories that I have are living memories.  I have no idea what my great grandparents, and the parents before them endured, for their experiences are forgotten.

Approximate number of generations of my family affected within and after the Mount Elgin Indian Industrial Institute Muncey, Ontario. 1851 - 1949

1840   Forgotten
1855   Forgotten
1870   Forgotten
1884 Great grandmother Susan Shilling-Knot
1901 Grandmother Eva Shilling
1936 Mother Jean Deleary
1961 Me Nancy Deleary
1983 Daughter Carla Jones
2011 Grand daughter Isabella Edmonds

 

In Honouring My Grandmothers and Grandfathers I also acknowledge and honour our indigenous intellectuals and knowledge holders for their diligence in sharing our original instructions and worldview. It was from them that I learned of the sacred relatives we have in all of creation. The first father of creation is the air. The first mother of creation is the earth.  It is the responsibility of Father Sky to provide for and protect Mother Earth while she gives birth and provides nourishment.  Without one or the other, we cannot survive.

The installation consists of a residential school dress that represents Mother Earth, my grandmothers, and all of our mothers; for all that she has gone through in the many generations and eras of cultural genocide and exploitation.  The YouTube video of Ryan Arcand, a homeless man from Edmonton, Alberta represents Father Sky, my grandfathers, and all of our fathers with the beautiful music he still manages to create, despite destitution and destruction, with the sounds that travel through the air, from his hands and spirit to our ears and spirit.

This art installation speaks of survivance and resilience: of the strength of spirit within to remember, overcome and express who we are.